Schaffer Online Library of Drug Policy Sign the Resolution for a Federal Commission on Drug Policy

 

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Resolution for a Federal Commission on Drug Policy

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The Resolution for a Federal Commission on Drug Policy calls upon the US President and Congress to admit that there are serious problems with our drug policy which deserve to be openly and honestly examined, in full view of the American public.  We ask the President and Congress to form an objective Federal commission to examine all of the evidence and to make recommendations for changes.  It is only through open and honest examination of the evidence that we will resolve the many controversies with respect to drug policy, and move toward a better policy.

We ask that everyone sign the Resolution and send it to their elected officials.  We do not ask anyone to support any particular plan for solving the drug problem.  We simply ask you to support an open and honest examination of the evidence.

History of the Resolution For a Federal Commission on Drug Policy

The idea for and the text of the Resolution was created by Judge James P. Gray, Dr. S. Clarke Smith, Kathy Smith, and Clifford A. Schaffer in January, 1993.  It was formally signed at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University on February 26, 1993 by the persons listed in the Introduction by Judge James P. Gray.

From the first signing of the Resolution it was apparent that this was a significant call for reform.  It was signed by people from around the world.  We have included both a short list, and a long list of signers.  It gained quite a bit of public attention, including four major network television specials and hundreds of newspaper articles.

In 1993, it was signed at a united press conference held by the Mayors of San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose, California.

In 1993, it was presented to Drug Czar Lee Brown by Judge Gray and Joseph McNamara.   They asked for Mr. Brown's support of an open and honest review of drug policy.   He did not want to support such a review. 

In 1994, a section was included in the Crime Bill which provided for the establishment of a commission to study drug policy.   To date, no such commission has been established.

In 1995, the supporters of the drug war became so concerned about the media coverage given the Hoover Resolution that they tried to make their own resolution to counter it.   This was called the Atlanta Resolution Against Legalization.   It should be noted that the Resolution for a Federal Commission on Drug Policy does not ask anyone to support any particular plan for solving the drug problem, and makes no mention of legalization.

In 1996, Judge James P. Gray formally asked Drug Czar Barry McCaffrey to sign the Resolution and support an objective Federal commission on drug policy.  Barry McCaffrey replied that legalization would be a bad idea.  Judge Gray had not mentioned legalization at all, but had simply asked General McCaffrey to support an open and honest review of the evidence.  This correspondence will soon be coming to these web pages.

We will continue to use the list of signers to this Resolution to show the need and support for drug policy reform in the United States. 

 

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